The land of the giants

Truly the last frontier of Canada, the Yukon’s sparse population leaves plenty of room for big stuff. Like the biggest non-polar icefields in the country. Or like the tallest mountains in Canada, in Kluane National Park and Reserve. Mount Logan, the granddaddy of them all, is the highest peak in the land, coming in at a staggering 5,959 metres. That’s almost 11 CN Towers tall!
 
Yukon’s rivers also run to legendary proportions. The mighty Yukon River stretches over 3,000 kilometres from beginning to end. It weaves its way through the Yukon landscape, criss-crossing canoe-able rivers, glacier-fed lakes and world-class national and territorial parks. Not to mention enough ancient glacial ice to keep your warmest drinks cool, even under the summer’s blazing midnight sun.
 
And let’s not forget the living and breathing giants of the Yukon wild. The territory is a haven for some of North America’s most impressive species. In fact, there are 2 moose for every human — and 2 humans for every bear! With so much wildlife hanging around, and endless opportunities to see them along the highways, it’s good to be prepared. Odds are you’ll be seeing more animals—big and small—than you ever dreamed.
 
Among the large-and-in-charge variety you’ll want to watch for grizzly and black bears, wolves, moose, muskox and a herd of over 200,000 caribou. Smaller but still plentiful are the lynx, coyote, wolverine, Dall’s sheep and hoary marmot.
 
But don't think that wildlife viewing is limited to those areas outside the city limits. If you're staying in Whitehorse, you’ll be spotting red foxes and chatty ravens before you can even finish your morning coffee. After all, it isn't called the Wilderness City for nothing.